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RECYCLE & WIN AT THE CLEAN VIBES TRADING POST!

Rock The Ocean and Tortuga Music Festival teamed up with Clean Vibes last year and recycled over 40,000 pounds of waste through their Trash-For-Trade program. We’re doing it again this weekend! Here’s how it works:  1. Grab a blue bag from the Clean Vibes Trading Post in Conservation Village. 2. Collect cups, cans, and bottles from throughout the festival grounds and turn them in. Read More…

COASTAL DEVELOPMENT’S HIGH PRICE

Developing our ocean’s coastlines may seem like a fool-proof way to improve the economy and pull in tourist dollars — but in the long-run, we’ll pay a higher price for destroying them. Coastal counties only account for 17% of the United States, but they are home to more than half of our nation’s population. With. Read More…

WE CAN’T ROCK THE OCEAN IF IT’S EMPTY

As the old saying goes, “there are plenty of fish in the sea.” Turns out, there even fewer fish than we thought, and their numbers are rapidly declining. We all know that overfishing is a huge issue, but few of us realize the true scale of devastation. Even fewer know how reversible it is. OCEAN2012. Read More…

TORTUGA IS BACK!

It’s official—Rock the Ocean’s Tortuga Music Festival is back April 12-13 at Fort Lauderdale Beach Park! For the second year in a row, Tortuga aims to raise awareness about marine conservation and issues affecting the world’s oceans by bringing together music with meaning. We’ve got some big things in the works, so stay tuned for. Read More…

CORAL REEF DESTRUCTION: HOW YOU CAN HELP

We’ve already lost 27% of the world’s coral reefs and if things don’t drastically change, that number will continue to increase. The Nature Conservancy spells out ten different ways that we can all make a positive impact on reefs around the globe. One such way is ensuring that you dispose of your trash properly. When. Read More…

BLUEFIN TUNA AT RISK

Experts warn that stocks of bluefin tuna, a fish commonly used in sushi dishes, have dropped. Studies indicate that the breeding stock of tuna in the Pacific, which was estimated at 130,000 tons around 1960, dropped to 23,000 tons as of 2010. A recent report warned this number could fall below 18,000 tons in the. Read More…